Mozilla

PIPA/SOPA and Why You Should Care

January 17th, 2012

Congress is considering the most talked-about copyright legislation in a decade, known as Protect IP (PIPA) in the Senate and Stop Online Piracy (SOPA) in the House. Today, Mozilla announced that we’ll join with other sites in a virtual strike to protest PIPA/SOPA.

SOPA makes all of us potential criminals if we don’t become the enforcement arm of a new government regulatory and policing structure. SOPA does not target websites serving up unauthorized content. SOPA does not target people accessing those websites. SOPA targets all the rest of us. These costs are significant, wide-ranging and long lasting. To understand more clearly what SOPA does and the range of consequences, it’s helpful to use an analogy from the physical world where we all have many years of experience.

Assume there’s a corner store in your neighborhood that rents movies. But the movie industry believes that some or even all of the videos in that store are unauthorized copies, so that they’re not being paid when people watch their movies. What should be done?

SOPA/PIPA don’t aim at the people trying to get to the store. SOPA/ PIPA don’t penalize or regulate the store itself. SOPA and PIPA penalize us if we don’t block the people trying to get to the store.

The solution under the proposed bills is to make it as difficult as possible to find or interact with the store. Maps showing the location of the store must be changed to hide it(1). The road to the store must be blocked off so that it’s difficult to physically get to there(2). Directory services must unlist the store’s phone number and address(3). Credit card companies(4) would have to cease providing services to the store. Local newspapers would no longer be allowed to place ads for the video store(5). And to make sure it all happens, any person or organization who doesn’t do this is subject to penalties(6). Even publishing a newsletter that tells people where the store is would be prohibited by this legislation(7).

This is what SOPA and PIPA would impose in the online world. It’s very different than targeting the owner of the video store directly. The obligations to make websites hard to find apply to all citizens and businesses. Each one of us is subject to punishment and fines if we don’t follow these prohibitions. And, because SOPA/PIPA create a new regulatory structure, we become subject to punishment without the due process protections citizens normally enjoy.

Supporters say they are only targeting foreign websites outside US jurisdiction. However the burden of compliance that falls on all of us is not any less because the website servers are elsewhere. And in any case, many US companies with be affected through their locally-identified sites (for example, amazon.co.uk.)

Despite their over-reaching nature, PIPA and SOPA may not even be effective at stopping online piracy. People can still enter the actual Internet Protocol address of a blocked domain name. Sites can register new domain names. Continuously sanitizing the Internet of any mention or link to bad sites is a like the infamous game of “whack-a-mole.”

SOPA and PIPA are dangerous.  So, what to do?

Legislatively:

  • Reject SOPA / PIPA soundly.
  • Congress must not adopt the SOPA position of protecting content AT ALL COSTS. Congress must represent all of us.
  • Focus specifically on the holes in today’s enforcement tools. Why are thePirateBay.ORG or MegaUpload.COM still operating? Why aren’t they part of the definition of “foreign site” in SOPA/PIPA?
  • Be very, very cautious about creating new liability because we’re unwilling to punish the people accessing unauthorized content

Philosophically:
Over time, developments in two areas are likely to make this issue recede dramatically. One will be the development of new business models that embrace technology, and consumer expectations of universal access. The second will be new technology that makes it easier for content owners to limit access. Content owners can decide if they want unlimited audiences and alternative revenue sources, of if they want potentially limited audiences and a pay-for-view revenue model. Today we are fighting over what to do in the meantime. The content industry has convinced many that “something must be done.” Even if one agrees with this (which many do not), one thing is clear.

Protecting content at all costs is a disaster.

Footnotes
(1) This is the phyical world equivalent of blocking DNS, which is required by SOPA. 112 HR 3261 Title I, Sec 102 c 2 A i (pp 14, ln 1)
(2) This is the physical world analogy for ISPs obligation to “prevent access” to suspected infringing sites. 112 HR 3261 Title I, Sec 102 c 2 A i (pp 14, ln 1) says that “A service provider shall take technically feasible and reasonable measures designed to prevent access by its subscribers located within the United States to the foreign infringing site.”
(3) Removing the video store from the phone book is analogous to preventing any search engines from showing links to a suspected infringing site, which is required under 112 HR 3261 Title I, Sec 102 c 2 B (pp 15, ln 17).
(4) SOPA requires that payment processors stop sanding payments to the accounts of suspected infringing sites. 112 HR 3261 Title I, Sec 102 c 2 C i (pp 16, ln 3)
(5) Advertisers are not allowed to show ads on suspected infringing sites, to show ads for suspected infringing sites in other places, or to pay for ads that have already been served. 112 HR 3261 Title I, Sec 102 c 2 D (pp 17, ln 5).
(6) SOPA allows the Attorney General (under 112 HR 3261 Title I, Sec 102 c 4 A (pp 18, ln 23) or a private party who thinks they’ve been harmed (112 HR 3261 Title I, Sec 103 c 4 (pp 42, ln 3) ) to pursue damages from anyone who doesn’t follow these rules, and doesn’t place a limit on the amount of any damages that could be assessed.
(7) “Circumvention tools” — anything that tells you where a site is, even after it’s been removed from the DNS (the Internet’s “map”) are prohibited by 112 HR 3261 Title I, Sec 102 c 4 A ii (pp 19, ln 8 )

 

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126 comments for “PIPA/SOPA and Why You Should Care”

  1. 1

    Pingback from Mozilla to Join Tomorrow’s Virtual Protests of PIPA/SOPA | The Mozilla Blog

    [...] Chairwoman Mitchell Baker has a blog post that further explains our concerns with the legislation, using a powerful analogy from the physical world to highlight how misdirected PIPA and SOPA are at [...]

  2. 2

    Stuart Shields said on January 17th, 2012 at 9:47 pm:

    I’d like to see this happen across the board on every website in every country that Mozilla runs. Wikipedia unfortunately is only doing it to the English version so it’s point is limited by that very fact.

  3. 3

    Margaret Lux said on January 17th, 2012 at 9:58 pm:

    Who is the non-sensical braniac that popped up with an idiotic controlling idea like this? Another Neo-Nuzi in the internet world.? Please shame on you. Your Mother should have slapt you when you were born instead of kissing you!

  4. 4

    Pingback from Minutes Before the SOPA Blackouts Start, Mozilla Also Joins the Cause — SiliconFilter

    [...] Baker writes, "there’s a corner store in your neighborhood that rents movies. But the movie [...]

  5. 5

    Pingback from Stop internet censorship by protesting PIPA and SOPA | A Hen's Nest

    [...] PIPA/SOPA and Why You Should Care [...]

  6. 6

    skierpage said on January 17th, 2012 at 10:17 pm:

    Well done.

    As I understand it, it’s worse than your analogy. Someone who doesn’t like the video store renting a documentary critical of them can activate all this machinery against anyone providing information about the video store, and everyone’s only recourse is expensive legal action to contest it.

    Typo “The obligations to made websites hard to find”, should be “make” #corrections

  7. 7

    Gavin S. said on January 17th, 2012 at 10:26 pm:

    SOPA would kill anything. Looking at all the things it could do, it doesn’t look pretty!

  8. 8

    Pingback from Mozilla and PIPA/SOPA | Thoughts from Gary Kovacs

    [...] Today, Mozilla demonstrated our opposition to PIPA/SOPA by blacking out key Mozilla websites. While we generally support the end goal of the legislation – to limit online piracy of legitimate content – we believe that both PIPA and SOPA, in their current drafts, have serious flaws in the proposed implementation of the legislation. Among them is the requirement for online service and content providers to police the system. This would create an undue burden on businesses that were not designed for this purpose, would require more lawyers to be involved, and would extend the hand of government much deeper into these organizations. All of this would spread a chilling effect across the Web that would significantly limit innovation, which has implications for all of us. More alarming is the reality that sites could be taken down based solely on the mere suspicion of illegal content, not based on the ruling of a body of legal authority. The lack of due process is a serious flaw, a threat to each of our rights as citizens, and simply should not be accepted. Mitchell Baker, Mozilla Chairwoman has a comprehensive post outlining our stance on PIPA/SOPA. [...]

  9. 9

    connie said on January 17th, 2012 at 10:29 pm:

    how long is this black out going to last very confused here plus will people be able to get in there sites to do like games yahoo anything what is this?

  10. 10

    Stu Rees said on January 17th, 2012 at 10:39 pm:

    We have five new SOPA cartoons at http://www.stus.com/techwars that anyone can use to raise awareness.

  11. 11

    asdf said on January 17th, 2012 at 10:47 pm:

    The problem I have with these PIPA/SOPA protests is that it accepts the premise that inventors/authors should have the ability to use state violence to prevent other people from copying their ideas and that people who don’t agree that ideas can be owned should be forced to subsidize IP enforcement costs.

    Why doesn’t mozilla do something bold like collecting signatures to pass a constitutional amendment that would eliminate the patent and copyright system altogether?

    Then things like SOPA, EFF, DMCA, GPL, software patents, etc. become irrelevant.

  12. 12

    ct said on January 17th, 2012 at 10:55 pm:

    just another way to secure more money from us
    even with the high prices on our everyday consumables and high taxes this is just another way for them to milk us and control how we live to many people in politics that are there for the image and the power and not for humanity

  13. 13

    Pingback from PIPA/SOPA: Not good for anybody’s health « Binary Sunrise

    [...] discussed politics on my blog, and as a non-US citizen I am particularly helpless to do anything. Mitchell and many others have already posted level-headed arguments on why PIPA/SOPA isn’t going to [...]

  14. 14

    Pingback from PIPA/SOPA: Not good for anybody’s health « Binary Sunrise

    [...] my blog, and as an Indian citizen I am particularly helpless to do anything about U.S. legislation. Mitchell and many others have already posted level-headed arguments on why PIPA/SOPA isn’t going to [...]

  15. 15

    Pingback from Wikipedia, Google blackout sites to protest SOPA | Brian's Blog Site

    [...] arm of a new government regulatory and policing structure,” Mozilla chairwoman Mitchell Baker wrote in a blog post [...]

  16. 16

    Pingback from Imagine a World without Free Knowledge! | Nature's Wonderland Article Base

    [...] Both steps are aimed at informing and mobilizing millions of our users on this important issue.  Mozilla’s Chairwoman Mitchell Baker has a blog post that further explains our concerns with the le…, using a powerful analogy from the physical world to highlight how misdirected PIPA and SOPA are at [...]

  17. 17

    Pingback from what is SOPA by clarinette02 - Pearltrees

    [...] PIPA/SOPA and Why You Should Care | Mitchell's Blog SOPA does not target people accessing those websites. SOPA targets all the rest of us. These costs are significant, wide-ranging and long lasting. To understand more clearly what SOPA does and the range of consequences, it’s helpful to use an analogy from the physical world where we all have many years of experience. [...]

  18. 18

    Pingback from ¡Huye lobo! | Huye lobo

    [...] de Mitchel Baker, de la Fundación Mozilla ( original en inglés ). La traducción es mía. Se ruega [...]

  19. 19

    A said on January 18th, 2012 at 2:59 am:

    Shouldn’t mozilla be already “on strike”? Maybe it’s that it is geo-targetted (I’m not in US)? After wandering for several mozilla domains, I don’t see anything like a blackout, logo change… Not even a text banner.

    about:home is also not showing as the provided screenshot, although I don’t know how that was expected to work, given that the images are loaded from chrome.

  20. 20

    Pingback from Wikipedia, Google blackout sites to protest SOPA | Partners In Sublime

    [...] arm of a new government regulatory and policing structure,” Mozilla chairwoman Mitchell Baker wrote in a blog post [...]

  21. 21

    Pingback from Mozilla si unisce a sciopero contro la censura del Web

    [...] Dal blog di Mitchell Baker, presidentessa della Mozilla Foundation: http://blog.lizardwrangler.com/2012/01/17/pipasopa-and-why-you-should-care/ [...]

  22. 22

    Pingback from Internet Blackout to Protest SOPA

    [...] arm of a new government regulatory and policing structure,” Mozilla chairwoman Mitchell Baker wrote in a blog post [...]

  23. 23

    manasi said on January 18th, 2012 at 4:18 am:

    1) I agree that the unintended consequences of PIPA and SOPA are terrifyingly bad.
    2) I agree that most lawmakers have NO clue about what they are talking about.
    3) Please do not start sentences with And, or However, and make sure that spelling is coherent the sentence “The obligations to made websites hard to find apply to all citizens and businesses.” needs to be amened to “make” not made.

    Commas are nice to have in the right areas as well. I understand this is written with passion in mind, but spelling, punctuation, and coherence REALLY do matter.

    Best Wishes

  24. 24

    Pingback from Wikipedia, Google blackout sites to protest SOPA - TECHNOLOGY GADGETS – TECHNOLOGY GADGETS

    [...] arm of a new supervision regulatory and policing structure,” Mozilla president Mitchell Baker wrote in a blog post [...]

  25. 25

    Pingback from Wikipedia goes dark, Google logo blacked out | FT Tech Hub | FTtechhub - Industry analysis – FT.com

    [...] blackout protest, such as Reddit, Yahoo (via its Flickr photo-sharing site), Mozilla (creator of Firefox) and Tumblr. It is not just US companies protesting against the bill. Even Riot, a Los [...]

  26. 26

    Elizabeth Morowati said on January 18th, 2012 at 5:34 am:

    Congress and the Whitehouse have deliberately, decisively, openly, sent us on a path of being a centralized, controlled society, were freedoms of the individual are considered irrelevent to the power of the state. This must be stopped in it’s tracks…individual by individual, issue by issue, by throwing the extremists out as soon as possible, putting not only term limits into the mix, but reducing the power of the unseen bureaucrats who really control the strings.

  27. 27

    Pingback from Anche Mozilla sciopera contro la legge SOPA | oneWeb20

    [...] sul blog di Mitchell Baker, presidentessa della Mozilla Foundation, si parla di SOPA e PIPA, identificandoli come pericolosi e [...]

  28. 28

    william Little said on January 18th, 2012 at 5:54 am:

    I was a active member in the USA Army in Vietnam to help FREEDOM rain down on the people.
    Now am I in a commenists lead Country? How can we let this go forward,we must stand up now for our freedom against our own US Congress .

  29. 29

    manuel gonzalez said on January 18th, 2012 at 5:56 am:

    dont mess with my internet

  30. 30

    manuel gonzalez said on January 18th, 2012 at 5:57 am:

    I want my fredom of speech

  31. 31

    Pingback from Mozilla si unisce a sciopero contro la censura del Web | NEWS, notizie, informazione, politica, sport e attualità

    [...] Dal blog di Mitchell Baker, presidentessa della Mozilla Foundation: http://blog.lizardwrangler.com/2012/01/17/pipasopa-and-why-you-should-care/ [...]

  32. 32

    William George said on January 18th, 2012 at 6:02 am:

    Agreed. Go Team Mozilla.

  33. 33

    Elsie Kimmel said on January 18th, 2012 at 6:16 am:

    With all of the problems in this country today, you must have something better to do, than take more freedom from the American people. You are not only paid for the time you are in office, but forever there after, that is where there needs to be change. The waste of money in our Government is a crime in itself.

    Let’s fix what is broken and leave other things alone.

  34. 34

    Rob Reppert said on January 18th, 2012 at 6:17 am:

    This is what happens you let progressives (which are in both parties btw) take control. All companies have to do to fight this pirate conspiracy is adjust their products to what market demands. Sadly they have not been willing to do that. Instead they increase their prices, fix them in a quasi-monopoly way (via RIAA and MPAA etc…) then get lawmakers to enforce and impose their price instead of the free market.

  35. 35

    Joseph Price Cameron said on January 18th, 2012 at 6:26 am:

    Even though I don’t have a website, I don’t want any government agency at any level of government to have any control of the Internet. That would amount to “Big Brotherism” at its worst.

  36. 36

    cybermonk said on January 18th, 2012 at 6:32 am:

    But isn’t Mitchel a man’s name? Shame on that woman’s parents. So when someone sees the name CEO Mitchel Baker on the office door, don’t you HR pansies get your tits in a wad calling a person “sexiest” for referring to this person as a “him” when they never have met the person.

  37. 37

    D Duer said on January 18th, 2012 at 6:33 am:

    I live in Nashville, TN where the theft of copyright is a major issue. Since it seems that many people believe that downloading for free is their God given right, there are many music artists in our area that are suffering from their loss of revenue.

    I believe that Mozilla is making a mistake in taking sides with those who would steal from others! When the musicians and artists are forced to abandon their chosen profession, because they cannot make a living due to piracy, the entire world will be the loser.

  38. 38

    Louis Rosenbaum said on January 18th, 2012 at 7:46 am:

    The power of the Internet can be used for the benefit of us all and against us all.
    Governments have not yet demonstrated that the government acts in the best interests of its people. It often acts in the interest of perceived threaqts to their power and beauracracy.

  39. 39

    Echofox said on January 18th, 2012 at 8:08 am:

    We have the same problem in France with the HADOPI law , Mr Stallman has left a message when this law was voted! Thanks Richard
    Internet is freedom and “LIBRE EXPRESSION”.

    Sorry, for my poor English(and/or American) message, I’m an old people of France and I hate when the liberty of people is compromised by power people which want to control the “WEB”.

    Don’t leave the war, for me it’s just a question of liberty

    Thanks to read.
    Have a nice night .

    Echofox

  40. 40

    Dawnya Ward said on January 18th, 2012 at 8:18 am:

    I totally agree with everything Mozilla is saying and it is against our privacy rights. The government did not want us to use it this way then they should have just kept it for them when they created it for intelligence and communication back in the 50′s. It is ours now too, so they need to leave it as it is.

  41. 41

    Darron Mould said on January 18th, 2012 at 8:19 am:

    All I can do from here in England is voice my support of the tide against SOPA. Good luck to everyone fighting it and let not only myself, but other Internet users in the UK know what more we can do.
    The Internet was formed in the USA, the WWW came about because of an Englishman. We should stand side-by-side in this.

    Don’t let the Internet go dark.

  42. 42

    Robert A Koontz Sr said on January 18th, 2012 at 8:24 am:

    No reguilations for the internet, just need to get rid of trash. No more adds for jobs most are their to get, steal your money.

  43. 43

    sam said on January 18th, 2012 at 8:25 am:

    Are you kidding me? stop this nonsense folks, iserved 2 military branches to be free and this seems like a take some freedom away? do i have to move out of this country or waht????

  44. 44

    al said on January 18th, 2012 at 8:29 am:

    It maybe bring you all to the red list of fema if you give your address on the take action button….

  45. 45

    irma onerva said on January 18th, 2012 at 8:31 am:

    Thanks for your fight.
    It is so upsetting that the Republicans (mostly them) try to take away as many liberties as possible from the ordinary American citizens (see what they have done in Wisconsin and other republican states) and now comes internet. (Apparently they want to make sure that the wealth of the richest people is not threatened.) Internet has facilitated revolution in Arab countries. I doubt that Americans are ready for revolution, but we certainly are not ready to go back 100 years! When want to retain our constitutional freedoms!

  46. 46

    Michael Kaply said on January 18th, 2012 at 8:42 am:

    Irma:

    I guess you haven’t researched the bill. Patrick Leahy is sponsoring the Senate bill and he is a Democrat.

    It’s politicians that want to take away our freedoms, not Democrats/Republicans.

  47. 47

    Rev. Jerry said on January 18th, 2012 at 8:59 am:

    I am sick and tired of people bashing the Republicans on everything! They are the only ones who have tried to stop the Democrats from taking more and more freedoms away from us. The Democrats have stolen from Social Security over and over and blamed it on the Republicans. They are for every evil thing that goes on like, abortion, homosexuality, forced unionization and higher taxes. It’s time for these foolish people to study and get their facts straight before they open their mouths and show how foolish they are. If it is up to the Democrats, they would take away our religious freedoms and install Sharia Law. (by the way, the unions in this country are like a form of Sharia law, enforced by the same type of idiots and bullies, who threaten, ruff up and kill people.) Get real people, the line has been drawn in the sand her on the internet issue. Are you not being watched enough now by street cameras, fixed speed traps, even the state police here in Tennessee have an ad on television saying: “We’re watching you and we are going to get you!” Talk about intimidation! Oh, they will say it is for drunk drivers but we know that it is just like the Gustafo or something. This loss of freedoms must stop now!
    Washington and the world needs to know that Americans have had enough and today it stops!

  48. 48

    Pingback from Why I care so much about stopping SOPA/PIPA (and why you should care too) » UNDERDOG of PERFECTION [ a blog on technology, music and geek culture from room34 ]

    [...] Mitchell Baker: On PIPA/SOPA and Why You Should Care [...]

  49. 49

    Brencan said on January 18th, 2012 at 9:14 am:

    This is recockulous. The next step of government take overs.

  50. 50

    Brendan said on January 18th, 2012 at 9:15 am:

    This is recockulous. Another step for the government taker overs?, I think not!!!

  51. 51

    zack said on January 18th, 2012 at 9:23 am:

    iv only known about this for half of a year, it isn’t anything new… but it is an annoyance. the government doesn’t want “takeovers” they want massive censorship, like the FCC in that episode of family guy. realistically they want you to have to ask to do the smallest of actions, this wouldn’t be an issue if the company’s that benefit were not paying to have it written.

  52. 52

    Pingback from Wikipedia down - Page 2

    [...] legislation would do, I recommend reading the blog that Mozilla's chairwoman wrote on the subject PIPA/SOPA and Why You Should Care | Mitchell's Blog It has a practical example, and demonstrates the insidious nature of this legislation. [...]

  53. 53

    nyan kitteh said on January 18th, 2012 at 9:34 am:

    @ coment #49, so democrats support evil? and homosexuality is evil? and religions have not caused over 50 percent of the wars so far? driving drunk is stupid. and why do the republicans say unions are evil? is it maybeh because there good for the WORKERS not the large COMPANYS? have you read the patriot act? and you say your not foolish? im not a democrat, or a republican. to me you seem like the kind of person who should be thrown out of this country with others of your kind (peta,wbc,etc) …

  54. 54

    cypher said on January 18th, 2012 at 9:37 am:

    i strongly believe that wrongs are being wronged on both sides here one most people that claim to stand against this are accually the pirates this bill was ment to get rid of i also really dont care about the internet being dark if worse comes to worse the few smart ones of us will revert to bulletin board systems again this bill never really did have any chance of passing but even if it did the thing that pisses me off is the fact that the governtment is accually being leveraged by big mony cororations which is the highest of problems we have to worry about right now so please ban together and fight fight fight this bill with everything we have

  55. 55

    zack said on January 18th, 2012 at 9:37 am:

    @ 55 lol, @49 no need to comment the “nyan ketteh” prety much covered it ^_^

  56. 56

    jena rajendra said on January 18th, 2012 at 9:43 am:

    people’s will is greatest power. it should be respected by all nation, why unnecessary load demand on people. I am with Mozilla. access right is our legal right,no one deprive us from this right.
    Mitchell baker ” all internet user with you carry on your fight”

  57. 57

    Pingback from How the SOPA Day of Protests Played Out

    [...] is via a link. The chairwoman of Mozilla Mitchell Baker has issued a statement regarding the stance on her blog, as has the company’s CEO Gary [...]

  58. 58

    Carlos E. Rangel said on January 18th, 2012 at 10:11 am:

    The proposed governmental censorship of the Web would greatly harm the economy, because it would have the effect of obstructing and reducing business sales and transactions over the net; and this is the last thing the U.S. and the world need at the present time.

  59. 59

    Mary Ann Groves said on January 18th, 2012 at 10:22 am:

    They need to keep their noses out of the publics business. Before you know it they will be setting our bedtime, and tell us when we can go to the bathroom.

    Mainly though would sure hamper the way a lot of individuals, and companies in this world do business on a daily basis.

    I say leave things like they are. We are a free country(?) not a communist country.

  60. 60

    apotheon said on January 18th, 2012 at 10:32 am:

    Honestly, this bickering over whether it’s the Democrats or the Republicans who are evil is ridiculous. You should all be deprived your after-nap cookies and sent to separate corners for a time-out. The people operating in government under both labels, Democrat and Republican, are pretty much all a bunch of corrupt, power-made liars. The difference is not that one is evil and the other is not, and the broadly bipartisan efforts to pass the PROTECT IP Act and SOPA should be a pretty good indicator, as were the broadly bipartisan efforts to pass the USA PATRIOT Act, the Military Commissions Act, the NDAA, and the various bailout bills that “stimulated” the economy by proppting up the very corporate decision makers who caused our recent economic hardship. The vast majority of politicians are lying to you, taking bribes, behaving hypocritically, anti-business, anti-worker, and anti-freedom, all at once. The label means nothing; it is a wedge used to separate the voters into warring classes who will never realize they don’t have to vote for Reptile D or Reptile R; they could vote for a human being instead.

  61. 61

    Keith Brown said on January 18th, 2012 at 10:45 am:

    Please stop with the communism acts, pretty soon we’ll be like China. That is what it is coming to they already tell what where and when we can do things that they shouldn’t. Giving the government the ability to pass this law is absurd. Keep them OUT of our business!!!!!!!
    Thank You,
    Keith J Brown

  62. 62

    Pingback from SOPA and “The Great Firewall of America:” what it is and how to kill it « o p e n m a t t

    [...] PIPA/SOPA and Why You Should Care — Mozilla’s Chief Lizard Wrangler, Mitchell Baker [...]

  63. 63

    Peter said on January 18th, 2012 at 10:56 am:

    “The obligations to *make” (“make”, not “made”)

  64. 64

    Lisa said on January 18th, 2012 at 10:56 am:

    This legislation is about protecting narrow interests, not the broader one, the common good! And isn’t our US government already overburdened? Out-dated computers, bankrupt postal service, the list goes on and on … perhaps they could not afford to truly enforce these laws if they were passed because their IT infrastructure is said to be outdated (surprise, surprise). It would be enforced capriciously, at very least … it is hard to say how sinister this would be unless it were enacted in which case it might be too late to rescind it. A can of worms, a Pandora’s box … an unknown trick bag we dare not open.

  65. 65

    Lisa said on January 18th, 2012 at 10:58 am:

    Furthermore, who wants to be in the same league with China and other oppressive countries? Least of all us, the supposed bastion of freedom!0

  66. 66

    James Anderson said on January 18th, 2012 at 11:00 am:

    I agree with one of your commenter that a list of objectors should be made and delivered to a body of worth. This is too limited. What I mean is, I generally don’t read emails like this, but I heard on the news, last night, that Wikepedia was going on strike. Had I not heard that I would surely not have opened this email. It would also have been nice to give those who may not want to take the extra step of finding the web addresses of their Senetors and Congressmen a list of who they are and how to contact them for comment for each state so they could email them.
    Thank you for taking the time, nonetheless, of doing this. It is an outrage that such thinking is even allowed. Their grandchildren and generations after will live in shame.

  67. 67

    Rhonda Red-Bear said on January 18th, 2012 at 11:11 am:

    Please keep our freedom.

  68. 68

    Pingback from DU Pirate Party » SOPA and Stuff

    [...] Here’s a little article to explain the bills [...]

  69. 69

    Pingback from SOPA-PIPA IN THE REAL WORLD « SF Blogging

    [...] (Portions taken from Mozilla Chairwoman Michelle Baker’s letter on SOPA) [...]

  70. 70

    Richard O. Sais said on January 18th, 2012 at 11:44 am:

    Moszila.com Go for it! I support you!!

  71. 71

    Austin Hoffman said on January 18th, 2012 at 11:57 am:

    This is just terrible….SOPA is the equivalent of curing a headache with a guillotine. It may stop piracy, but it would shut down our economy and unconstitutionally erode our most basic freedoms in the process.

    I just hope that everyone realizes how important this is and does their part to save the internet & our economy! …here is another good video that explains the consequences of SOPA pretty well:
    http://www.peeje.com/peeje-goes-strike-stop-web-censorship-bills-congress-209/

    1,000s of more websites have joined the force and went dark today, we need EVERYONES help!!!!

  72. 72

    sameralkutta said on January 18th, 2012 at 12:15 pm:

    indispensable to sopa should care does need to some of the time you know even what is
    characterized to tempers the people about this topics does scarab them taking the good chance
    arriving even what they wanting know begin for publisize each what you know on the style or
    the modern programs does whom for emanation on the internet and was even as information
    wanting the person loading in his mind.

  73. 73

    Kerry Strange said on January 18th, 2012 at 12:31 pm:

    Most of the things I look for on the web are woodworking sites. Knowing our government, I can only imagine an innocent site like that would be censored. Or, perhaps my online banking???? I think congress needs a complete overhaul with all new folks.

    Can someone explain the premise behind such thinking?

  74. 74

    stevy weavy said on January 18th, 2012 at 1:09 pm:

    Roll over and take it. there is nothing anyone can do. don’t think your vote has any impact once the few have made up their minds. thinning the herd is most likely next

  75. 75

    paul said on January 18th, 2012 at 1:24 pm:

    the only thing that the nwo understands is death do unto them as they do unto you ,
    learn the ways of the snake and you will see how to defeat your adversary’s that is the only way to accomplish freedom put the snakes to sleep forever

  76. 76

    Sandra Levine said on January 18th, 2012 at 1:38 pm:

    Please do not sensor the internet. We need freedom of speech!
    God bless America!!

  77. 77

    John Vassaw said on January 18th, 2012 at 2:03 pm:

    How much more government control of this administration before people wake up. It’s time to end this constant attack against our freedom as given in the Bill of Rights and Constitution of the United States, written by the Founding Fathers of our country. GOD BLESS AMERICA!!!

  78. 78

    JM said on January 18th, 2012 at 3:12 pm:

    so the problem is unknown people from countries outside the usa are creating fake websites, the way fake credit cards are created or fake currency is created. why can’t authentic websites have a hologram like on credit cards or watermark like on authentic currency? i think yahoo mail has this approach, making your own watermark.

  79. 79

    JM said on January 18th, 2012 at 3:25 pm:

    think about all the things that are duplicates and not the real thing,
    art, antique furniture, credit cards, currency, jewelry etc. how do people within these fields authenticate the real thing? often a lab test is done to authenticate something.

    so why can’t a software be developed to authenticate a real website and block a fake website? the software tests the website to see how authentic it is. maybe it looks for a watermark, a unique signature like in artwork done by a unique handwriting, it tests the age of the website like in art to determine its creation date perhaps websites register their creation date and this software will verify that date, in jewelery the gem is often observed under a microscope, looking for unique patterns why can’t there be unique underlying patterns done to the graphic design of the website, so why can’t software behave the same way as a microscope or lab test? to test and examine which websites are authentic and then let the end user know and then block the bad site.

    why can’t the software community come together and put out a product that will help stop fake websites from being made or accessed.

  80. 80

    JM said on January 18th, 2012 at 3:29 pm:

    in addition to above, create this product and present it to congress, say we have a new software that can help put a stop to this problem..sell the software and congress will feel happy that americans are spending their money on something useful to keep the economy going.

  81. 81

    Guero Nunez said on January 18th, 2012 at 3:35 pm:

    I am in agreement we need to keep this resource free of political/corporate ajendas, so I have already contacted my represenatives.

  82. 82

    vin said on January 18th, 2012 at 4:13 pm:

    stop it

  83. 83

    Pingback from Defeating SOPA and PIPA Isn’t Enough | GeekFreak

    [...] “stop” Internet piracy… in the most hamfisted way imaginable. As Mitchell Baker explains: Assume there’s a corner store in your neighborhood that rents movies. But the movie [...]

  84. 84

    Daryl said on January 18th, 2012 at 4:17 pm:

    This is more about those in power behind the scenes, the Government are just puppets. I am GEN X and have always paid to go to the cinema to watch a movie or gone and hired it at a video shop, same with my music I buy the CD and listen in my car on the way to work , not to loud or I could get violate public broadcast laws??? If this bill passes I will no longer support those in the media by purchasing CD’s or movies bought or hired, I’ll find some other form of entertainment.

    They can have the power, just not my money anymore.

    To the minority around the world that consider piracy a way of life, thanks very much, to the minority that want these laws passed you will be affected personally as well. All a democracy is about is voting for who tells us what to do and controls our lives.

  85. 85

    Echsentrik said on January 18th, 2012 at 4:30 pm:

    First and foremost, I am a creative. I believe firmly in my right and ability to protect my intellectual property as I would my physical property. The things that I create are how I make a living. It is MY job to protect MY property. I can require assistance from law enforcement should my property be illegally taken from me to help recover my property, but ultimately it’s my responsibility to make sure that what I create is being properly distributed and shared whether it be in the real-world or in this virtual world.

    I do, however, understand and agree with many of the points made by Mozilla, Google, Wikipedia and other sites who are actively protesting this legislation. I do believe in a free internet, where content is not monitored, flagged, and or otherwise removed because [they] possibly could be guilty of piracy, or aiding with piracy. But why ultimately penalize the public for the very specific cases of blatant misuse of media? It does appear that there is a lack of due process – it reads to me a bit “guilty before proven innocent,” but the damage is already done.

    The idea of the Internet and the web is in sharing content, however, content must be shared responsibly. There are other ways to tackle this issue, and the solution needs to involve industry professionals, business owners from all industries big and small and John Q. Public, not solely a room full of lawmakers who are often out of touch with what is actually happening outside of chambers. (Ref: banking failures, bail-outs and CARD Act legislation – and how these did not particularly help the public, though well-intended).

    Also, @Berillaz: Please edit your post for correct spelling, word usage and grammar before you generally call people “ignorant.” I think you could make your point far more effectively if you took a minute to make sure what you wrote reads intelligibly.

  86. 86

    P M Ravindran said on January 18th, 2012 at 5:09 pm:

    I am from India and I am with the freedom fighters. May your tribe increase!

  87. 87

    Bobbie J. Burgans said on January 18th, 2012 at 5:47 pm:

    This is just another nail in the coffin of the freedoms enjoyed in the United States today. Another method designed to bury the constitutional rights of all American citizens by stomping on the right to communicate freely and without restrictions imposed by the government, except when it impinges on someone else’s rights. Sad to say unless something is done in 2012 to change our governmental leaders, this type of regulation will continue; sooner or later forcing the NATURAL-BORN CITIZENS AND NATURALIZED CITIZENS in the USA to rise up and say ENOUGH!!! THIS IS NOT WHAT THIS COUNTRY IS BASED UPON. WE FLED THE TYRANNY IMPOSED UPON OUR FREEDOMS AND CAME TO THIS LAND AND ESTABLISHED A COUNTRY WITH A “BILL OF RIGHTS” AND A “CONSTITUTION” GUARANTEEING THOSE RIGHTS. THIS HAS STOOD FOR TWO HUNDRED PLUS YEARS UNTIL THE ELECTIONS IN 2008. NOW WE ARE FORBIDDEN TO TEACH RELIGION OR PRACTICE IT IN OUR SCHOOLS AND PUBLIC PLACES, UNDER THREAT OF FINE OR INCARCERATION. WE STILL HAVE OUR CHURCHES AND THE ABILITY TO PRACTICE OUR RELIGION WHILE IN OUR CHURCHES, BUT THE MUSLIM MOVEMENT IS BEING PUSHED UPON US MORE AND MORE, SO HOW LONG WILL OUR FREEDOM TO WORSHIP “AS WE PLEASE” REMAIN. This new legislation is an attempt to get a foothold in another freedom we have; Freedom of the Press and other methods of communication. Don’t let it happen! Stand up to them with your votes now and in the upcoming elections. Write your Senators and Representatives and let them know we are not going to stand for this anymore. No more secret meetings! No more secret bills passing without the peoples’ vote! No more hiding detrimental legislation in supposedly benign pieces of legislation.

    COME ON PEOPLE! STAND UP FOR YOUR RIGHTS BEFORE THERE ARE NONE TO STAND UP FOR!!!!!!!

  88. 88

    Nathan Starr said on January 18th, 2012 at 6:00 pm:

    We need to take every channel to stop this socialistic way oif operating!!!
    Can you send us the addresses of our Senators and Representatives? Thank you. I’m in zip code 76702

  89. 89

    Cody Lowe said on January 18th, 2012 at 7:04 pm:

    If firefox (mozilla) wants to help keep the internet from censorship they should spend some of there money not just ask us for money to “pay” for the fight against it. To hell with the owners of firefox and/or mozilla!

  90. 90

    Randy Atwood said on January 18th, 2012 at 8:12 pm:

    Let’s not fix something that isn’t broken. Internet (like many other issues) are another issue that the federal government need not be regulating. Let us get back to the constitution and the purpose of our government’s functions.

  91. 91

    Carol A Bell said on January 18th, 2012 at 8:22 pm:

    It’s just another way the gov’t is trying to take away our freedoms. We’d better hurry up and step up and hope we aren’t too late.

  92. 92

    Jeff Kaiser said on January 18th, 2012 at 9:51 pm:

    I want my money & freedom back! Spent a lot on new computer & internet access to surf whatever I want to. Without restrictions, without censorship & without fed intervention! Law suites are commin’ one way or another. “M@*$%# F*%@#&!!!!!!!!!!”

  93. 93

    Pingback from Wikipedia, Google blackout sites to protest SOPA : Welcome to 13 News Net

    [...] arm of a new government regulatory and policing structure,” Mozilla chairwoman Mitchell Baker wrote in a blog post [...]

  94. 94

    Maqsood Ahmed said on January 18th, 2012 at 10:40 pm:

    Just Another Lame effort by the U S Gov, if they cant keep the economy of their country right, how can one expect them to keep something as big as internet right, they will goof up and start blaming others, if not start another war :)….. They need to focus on what the country is going through right now, or maybe its an attempt to divert the attention from it. Either which ways, this is what it looks like Gov + Internet = Biased +Perspective with Gov Interest……. This should be called as the Freedom Movement and all you guys who are taking part are the Freedom Fighters….Keep up the Amazing work….

  95. 95

    Pingback from Internet Freedom | OPEA

    [...] Chairwoman Mitchell Baker has a blog post that further explains our concerns with the legislation, using a powerful analogy from the physical world to highlight how misdirected PIPA and SOPA are at [...]

  96. 96

    Pingback from Defeating SOPA and PIPA Isn’t Enough « Fast Ninja Blog by Freelanceful – Web Design | Coding | Freelancing

    [...] “stop” Internet piracy… in the most hamfisted way imaginable. As Mitchell Baker explains: Assume there’s a corner store in your neighborhood that rents movies. But the movie [...]

  97. 97

    CECILIA said on January 19th, 2012 at 3:03 am:

    I GOVERNO AMERICANO HA DELLE PRESSIONI CONTINUE DA TUTTI I GOVERNI DITTATORI E MASCHILISTI, NON VOGLIONO CHE IL POPOLO SI SVEGLI E SI RIBELLI INTERNET E’ CIO’ CHE DI PIU’ BELLO ABBIA AVUTO L’UOMO, RISCATTANDO LA LIBERTA’ DI PENSIERO E COMUNICARE CON TUTTO IL MONDO– –IN TEMPO REALE QUINDI BISOGNA LOTTARE PER PERMETTERE QUESTA EVOLUZIONE OBBLIGANDO AI GOVERNI DI CAMBIARE, E AL POPOLO DI VIVERE , IN PACE SENZA CONTINUE PRESSIONI DA PREPOTENTI CHE VOGLIONO COMANDARE SUGLI ALTRI PER SOLO POTERE

  98. 98

    Pingback from More on SOPA « Akshar Smriti

    [...] One good thing about geeks is that they are very good at whatever they do. Michell describes why SOPA and PIPA is bad for all of us in this beautiful article here. [...]

  99. 99

    barbara geelan said on January 19th, 2012 at 9:09 am:

    Please don’t let this happen to us!Thanks

  100. 100

    Wildfire said on January 19th, 2012 at 12:12 pm:

    We live in this country cuz why? Freedom!!! This so called government of ours is not a democracy. It feels like we are not allowed to do, go, or say anything. That’s really sad. They try to take away our Freedom of Speech, Freedom to Bear Arms. Now they want to take away the internet. Everybody’s information is already out due to shopping and banking online; that’s for starters. People need to not put out all their personal information online. They need to protect their information. It’s that simpke. You need to decide how much information about yourself you are willing to give away.
    Don’t let them take away our internet.

  101. 101

    Tim said on January 19th, 2012 at 12:28 pm:

    Seriously folks… This ISN’T OVER!

    YOU CANT TRUST ANYTHING OBAMA SAYS OR DOES !!!!!

    If he says its to be tabled… Be sure to pay attention to what he is doing behind his back at the same time…

    Pay Attention….

    He and his regime are not done trying to take complete control by a long shot!

    Tim

  102. 102

    Robert M. O’Grady said on January 19th, 2012 at 2:43 pm:

    I believe firmly in my right and ability to protect my intellectual property as I would my physical property. I do agree and support all the points made by Mozilla, Google, Wikipedia and other sites who are actively protesting this legislation. Americans have had enough of Washington regulatory commissions and it has to stop here.

  103. 103

    Pingback from Prosecuting Internet Pirates Awfully & Suppressing Online Privileges Aimlessly (NO to PIPA/SOPA) « Canon + on + on

    [...] In her recent blog, Mozilla chairwoman Mitchell Baker gave a brilliant analogy of how the proposed bills would cause more harm than good if implemented. Her blog can be accessed by clicking HERE. [...]

  104. 104

    Pingback from SOPA e PIPA: scontro tra Web ed entertrainment | Media 2000

    [...] degli emendamenti e la volontà di partecipare scurendo la pagina iniziale del software. Dal blog di Mitchell Baker,  presidentessa della Mozilla Foundation si legge: “Il SOPA rende tutti noi potenziali [...]

  105. 105

    Rosemary W said on January 20th, 2012 at 6:42 pm:

    I am a non-USA citizen. What happens to me if I want to order something from the US which a lot of companies in my country are now encouraging as it is cheaper for us as we escape taxes. Am I committing a crime? I don’t think so. Our government here is developing ideas to make things easier on the people. Why should you make it difficult for us as non-US citizens?

  106. 106

    Jean W. said on January 21st, 2012 at 4:41 pm:

    I also feel this is another bad idea that is coming from our government.

  107. 107

    Donna Wann said on January 21st, 2012 at 5:18 pm:

    Please don’t let this happen.

  108. 108

    Dsmith said on January 23rd, 2012 at 7:01 am:

    If you seriously do not want this type of government, then Mozilla and the rest need to endorse Ron Paul and we the people need to vote for Ron Paul. Otherwise, this will not stop.

  109. 109

    name said on January 24th, 2012 at 1:31 am:

    comment

  110. 110

    Pingback from #SOPA #usacensored | FRC Web Design

    [...] 8 a.m. eastern, Mozilla blacked out its homepage. The new message includes links to statements by Mozilla’s Chairwoman and CEO, along with a call to [...]

  111. 111

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  112. 112

    Pamela said on January 30th, 2012 at 4:31 am:

    I am stunned. Living in the UK and enjoying using an American server I wonder how this will affect the rest of the world. OK get rid of the peodophiles and the vilest of the sex trades online but leave the rest of us alone! I am a pensioner who enjoys shopping online, chatting to my friends. I am sick of the international phone calls and spams in my email name proclaiming this and that which is usually undersirable. Perhaps our governments ought to concentrate on these companies and track them where ever they set up camp, de-camp and set up all over again. These are the real rogues not us average every day users. What poppycock!!

  113. 113

    Pingback from Protesting PIPA and SOPA - Just another My blog Sites site - newcomputertechnologynews

    [...] Mozilla’s Chairman, Mitchell Baker Mozilla’s CEO, Gary Kovacs Mozilla’s Privacy and Public Policy Lead, Alex Fowler [...]

  114. 114

    Paul Blackburn said on February 10th, 2012 at 10:14 am:

    The people in power use their power or mis-use it, and make outlaws of law biding citizens. They take no reguards for other peoples natural rights. They take one swail swoop of the pen , or vote and one’s rights are gone, and mabe forever. Don’t let this happen!

  115. 115

    Pingback from Head of Mozilla Says ACTA Is ‘A Bad Way To Develop Internet Policy’ | Daily Hacking News

    [...] modified its home page, pointing to further information about SOPA. That, in its turn, linked to a post entitled “PIPA/SOPA and Why You Should Care,” written by Mitchell Baker, the Chair of [...]

  116. 116

    Flash said on February 16th, 2012 at 11:12 pm:

    The societal cost / benefit structure and ratio of “intellectual property” laws needs more careful consideration than just a bit of blogging or even forums or public roundtable events. It certainly needs more careful consideration than the typical politician gives it. EVERYTHING has “pros and cons” or costs and benefits. Perhaps the extremely slow-moving mechanism of lawsuits and the courts are slow enough for people to actually give large amounts of serious thought to these many actual costs and benefits.

    As an example, musicians have always been performers, and when broadcast radio was invented, musicians were thrilled, enamored, and irritated by it. Many found out just how skilled a small portion of musicians really were, and didn’t like their previously content fans listening to that radio instead of themselves. Some found favor with some broadcasters but were displeased by the overwhelming demands and low pay that came attached to that acceptance, and ultimately realised that “fame” was an illusion and a hoax. Some found favor with large numbers of listeners, but not the brokers (broadcasters) and wanted an easier way to connect to their “fans” support than actually travelling around and performing and being paid for those actual performances. Mass produced recordings of increasing quality and affordability were becoming an alternate means of earning some money for musicians, but rather than difficult, self-promoting broadcasters to deal with, record company execs that were both openly and covertly greedy and cunning thieves were the musicians new masters. As technology progressed it became easier to bypass these record companies by going “indie”, and getting the fans to deal with the broadcasters who were no longer so powerful, and selling recordings to and through fans. The “internet” could be used for promotion and even to sell recordings, except some people would simply enjoy your work without even paying the cover charge at a bar, or buying a CD from you between or after playing a set. Oh well.

    Anybody and everybody would like to get paid many times for doing one thing. A musician performs by playing or singing, and should (and will) be paid by his audience as a whole. An actor performs by acting, and also should and will be paid by their entire audience. If the paying audience feels abused by the non-paying audience, things may well be out of balance, and the paying audience will arrange a closed venue. If the musician feels underpaid for their work, they will stop performing or improve their performance.

    Performers are in fact paid by their entire audiences as a whole. Snoop Dog or Dr. Dre or some other rapper, hip-hopper or whatever will never be paid directly by me, and should never be paid indirectly by me, because I am not any part of their audience (I’m gonna have to google them to find out who/what they are!). I don’t blame them for wanting more pay! I don’t blame them for wanting something from me! Heck, I might enjoy seeing them, or one of them, actually in a live performance (not likely, but possible), but to get any of my money they’ll have to offer me something I’d be willing to purchase. If one of them or their counterparts tried to forcibly, physically take something from me otherwise it would be considered robbery (I don’t know, maybe that’s in their repertoire too already). Those that are making the most noise about being robbed of pay by the internet are those that simply do NOT perform! There is definitely a place for promoters, talent managers, legal representatives, and talent brokers. That place is questionable however, and is changing rapidly, and traditional aspects of their already questionable services are useless and they will in fact NOT be paid for doing some things, which clearly indicates that they should NOT do those things!

    My own current perception is that finally “the paybacks” have come around to the “record companies”, and of course they’re barking and squealing more loudly than ever, just as a few of my famous friends descriptively foretold in a little piece called “Animals” back in 1977.

    I’m happy to see that there are enough people of enough intelligence and foresight here among the mozzillians to present a clear alarm and resistance to this PIPA/SOPA activity. (all the sheep were kinda freakin’ me out…..)

  117. 117

    Pingback from Defeating SOPA and PIPA Isn’t Enough

    [...] “stop” Internet piracy… in the most hamfisted way imaginable. As Mitchell Baker explains: Assume there’s a corner store in your neighborhood that rents movies. But the movie [...]

  118. 118

    sams said on March 1st, 2012 at 12:54 am:

    Hi,

    Thank you four your nice writing on

    Thanks.

  119. 119

    Pingback from Mozilla反對SOPA「終止網路盜版法案」 | 訊息中心 | Mozilla Taiwan

    [...] Mozilla一向支持網路開放自由,在SOPA法案提出時便積極參與反SOPA聯盟活動。Mozilla基金會Mitchell Baker在其部落格中表示,SOPA 法案並無法有效針對提供盜版內容的網站,也無法禁止企圖透過網路取得盜版內容的網友繼續下載盜版內容,而是針對那些沒有主動禁止提供或下載盜版內容的網站平台作出懲罰,其後果將是危險的。 [...]

  120. 120

    Pingback from Today’s Links | tylor.co

    [...] “stop” Internet piracy… in the most hamfisted way imaginable. As Mitchell Baker explains: Assume there’s a corner store in your neighborhood that rents movies. But the movie [...]

  121. 121

    bitkiler said on March 18th, 2012 at 9:47 am:

    hi how long is this black out going to last very confused here plus will people be able to get in there sites to do like games yahoo anything what is this

  122. 122

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