Mozilla

Posts Tagged with “launch”

June 17, 2008

June 30th, 2008

Late last week a colleague expressed dismay that we didn’t have either a recorded version or a text version of the brief comments I made from Seoul via Air Mozilla on the release day of Firefox 3. So I took my notes and put them together into something that is close — certainly in spirit — though not exact.

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Every once in a while — for those people who are really lucky — we get to experience a moment where everything comes together. A period where dreams and hard work merge together with remarkable results.

This is such a time for Mozilla.

It’s based on hard work and execution of course. The number of people who have done something unexpected in the last few months, something that changes the outcome, is very high. But that’s only part of it. And there are plenty of times in life — most of life for most people, in fact — where people work hard and pour themselves into their effort but don’t experience the lift and buoyancy of sense of validation.

The periods that are so memorable often involve a team of people, and something that makes that group of people cohesive and satisfying. Sometimes these periods involve working on something that seems giant, hard to achieve and meaningful. Often then involve many things coming together in a way almost didn’t seem possible. And they involve a response from the world at large that demonstrates all the work and energy was worth it.

It’s incredibly fortunate to experience this at all. And it’s intensely gratifying to see these things come together for Mozilla.  It’s not just Firefox, it’s the entire Mozilla community. Firefox reflects the Mozilla community, giving us a chance to see how broad and deep the Mozilla world is, and how much can be accomplished. Eight million people — not only aware of a piece of software but acting on that awareness — in a day is astonishing.

The excitement isn’t all about a piece of software. The real activity is about the Internet. It’s about people not just using but also creating the Internet; creating an experience that is fun, safe, and productive. The Internet is a big deal. The ability to participate in creating it is a big deal. It’s rare that such a fundamental resource can be created by voluntary individual participation.

We can see that people sense the opportunity, want to participate, want to build and are more willing to share than might have been expected. We see this in the open source world, we see it in activities like Wikipedia, we see it in the growing range of activities using an “open source” model.

Mozilla has a role to play here. What a great place to be.

Firefox 3 — Tip of the Iceberg

June 17th, 2008

Today Mozilla releases Firefox 3 — fast, smart, safe, fun. Full of new things. Firefox 3 once again demonstrates how a great product makes Internet life better.

Firefox 3 is also the tip of a much bigger iceberg. For one thing, Firefox is the tip of the web itself. Firefox is exciting because the Web is exciting, and because Firefox does such a nice job of making the richness of the Web available to people in elegant, useful ways.

Firefox is the visible tip of an enormous amount of powerful, open-source technology. That technology makes Firefox possible, and it
also makes a range of other products possible. Some of these other products are released by Mozilla, some by other organizations.

Firefox is the tip of an enormous, wildly active community of people who are building a better Internet.

Firefox is the tip of an innovative development process that uses open source techniques in a range of activities extending far beyond code.

Firefox is all of these things. And it’s one unbelievably good browser.

Congratulations and thank-you to everyone who is participating in building Firefox and the Mozilla community.

Launch Day in Seoul

June 16th, 2008

Tomorrow I’ll be mixing OECD events with the Firefox 3 launch day and Mozilla community events. I’ll get up very early to participate in an Air Mozilla event coinciding (almost) with the official Firefox release. Then I’ll go to a local TV station to talk about Mozilla. The only downside is I’ll have to miss some of the interesting roundtables at the OECD Ministerial. That’s disappointing, but reflects how much is going on that is relevant to Mozilla. I’ll go back to the OECD for the lunch and afternoon events. Then in the evening I’ll have the chance to meet up with a significant group of Mozilla contributors. I’m really looking forward to this. The community in Korea has long been wildly creative, active and part of what makes Mozilla Mozilla.  It will be great fun to see Firefox release day from this vantage point.

Thursday I’ll participate in a forum on web standards and the importance of interoperability for a healthy Internet environment. “The Global Web Technology Workshop will be held for the adoption of global web technologies and web standards within the Korean web industry . . . ” This is organized by long-time Mozilla contributor Channy Yun. It should be a great opportunity to meet the broader web community within which Mozilla lives.

It’s a rare treat to combine three great events in one all-too-brief trip. The OECD, the Mozilla community on a Firefox release day, and a community interested in the open web. No doubt I’ll come home buzzing with excitement and stumbling with exhaustion!

Firefox 3 — The “End Game”

May 22nd, 2008

We’re getting very, very close to the release of Firefox 3. It’s an odd time around the Firefox part of the Mozilla project. Most of the Firefox and platform engineers are mostly done. The long, long push to get hundreds of issues triaged and resolved is over. Our first Release Candidate is out. Maybe we’ll do another release candidate, that depends on what we learn over the next short period. And if we do there will be a burst of activity. But the vast bulk of the engineering work is done. These engineers are already defining and working on the next projects, from Firefox to mobile. But there’s also a sense of waiting. Firefox 3 isn’t done until we’ve completed a massive test cycle, and there’s a constant and growing throbbing in the air as we work through the final stages.

Meanwhile, other groups of people are in high gear. The QA team is one. It’s a quiet storm of QA activity right now as we throw every test we’ve got at Firefox 3, looking for any cracks or stress points. It’s a quiet storm only because QA is a well-organized, experienced and highly effective team. Otherwise it would be a wild frenzy. Quite a contrast with the Firefox 1.0 release, where we hand-tested the localized versions up through the day of the launch itself, using an easel size pad of paper covered with a hand-written list of localizations and status updates.

Other engineering teams are hard at work as well. The web development team, for example, making sure sites like addons.mozilla.org are ready to go. The website content teams and localization teams are making sure that the many pages of content are available in the massive number of languages that are part of the Firefox 3 release. This includes both the websites themselves and the “product” pages which are part of Firefox. Build and release is the final stage of the release, so they are also in the thick of things right now.

The marketing team is extraordinarily busy, from community activities to press briefings to creating and distributing all the materials needed to explain Firefox: both new features and the overall pleasure of using Firefox to people who haven’t yet experienced what’s possible with Firefox. It’s a massive undertaking to launch a product with a userbase the size of Firefox. We couldn’t do it without the deep integration of the marketing team with the massive Mozilla community and we’re seeing that at work.

So we’re experiencing extreme levels of activity and performance in giant parts of the Firefox community. That’s combined with an intense sense of pressure building. It’s a little like seeing the first rays of sunshine appear on the horizon, and knowing that blazing ball of summer will appear soon.

Firefox 1.5: Better Than Ever

November 29th, 2005

Mozilla Firefox has changed the web. Firefox 1.5 continues that path. Firefox is changing the web by providing an innovative product that is worthy of people’s trust and by bringing consumers the respect we deserve.

People should be able to enjoy the power of the web without becoming experts in Internet and software technology. Firefox makes this possible. Firefox is easy to install, intuitive to use, and remarkable in its ability to bring people the complexity of the web through a comfortable interface.

People should be able to enjoy the power of the web without feeling abused or that our computers are out of control, and while enjoying serious protection against unwanted intrusions. Once again, Firefox delivers. Firefox provides a world where pop-up windows are almost non-existent. A world where one’s computer doesn’t seem to running wild. A product with multiple layers of defense against unwanted intrusions.

Already millions upon millions upon millions of people have moved to a better world by choosing Firefox as their web browser. Firefox 1.5 provides even more reasons to do so. Firefox 1.5 builds upon the great features in Firefox 1.0, offering even better pop-up protection, security and privacy enhancements and usability improvements. Firefox 1.5 also introduces a new mechanism through which Firefox can both alert people when a security or other update is available and also make it much easier for people to install important updates.

Firefox is exciting because the Web is exciting, and Firefox 1.5 shows the Web at its best. With Firefox 1.0 we inaugurated a set of search plugins to make search functionality even easier for people to use. We’ve heard over and over that people love this feature. With Firefox 1.5 we’re beginning a new search relationship with Yahoo in Japan, China, Taiwan and Korea as part of our strategic goal of helping people access a range of quality services through Firefox. Versions in these languages will have a Firefox start page powered by Yahoo and Yahoo as the first search option. Our search partnership with Google continues in the Americans and Europe. We’ve also added answers.com as a search option in the English language, U.S. version. We’ll continue to focus on making critical activities such as search easier for users in the future.

The Mozilla project creates Firefox because an innovative, trustworthy browser is critical to protecting the usefulness and health of the web. Firefox is the result of thousands of people who contribute their time and energy to demanding the best possible browser of ourselves and then making it happen. Some are employed to do this, some are volunteers. Some contribute through code, others by testing, others by encouraging people to try Firefox. Many, including the readers of this post, contribute by following the Mozilla project. Enormous numbers of people take it upon themselves to understand Firefox, to help others understand how easy and worthwhile it is to try Firefox, and to assist the project in innumerable ways. Together we create the product consumers both need and deserve: A product that respects the human beings that use it, harnesses the power of the web and gives people extraordinary choice in their online lives.

Firefox 1.5 is better than ever. With Firefox, the World Wide Web is better than ever. If you haven’t tried Firefox, now is the time: www.getfirefox.com. If you know people who haven’t tried Firefox, now is the time to help them to a better web experience: www.getfirefox.com.

Enjoy the web. Feel protected. Get Firefox.

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