Mozilla

Archive for the “Mozilla” Category

Busting the myth that net neutrality hampers investment

September 15th, 2017

This week I had the opportunity to share Mozilla’s vision for an Internet that is open and accessible to all with the audience at MWC Americas.

I took this opportunity because we are at a pivotal point in the debate between the FCC, companies, and users over the FCC’s proposal to roll back protections for net neutrality. Net neutrality is a key part of ensuring freedom of choice to access content and services for consumers.

Earlier this week Mozilla’s Heather West wrote a letter to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai highlighting how net neutrality has fueled innovation in Silicon Valley and can do so still across the United States.

The FCC claims these protections hamper investment and are bad for business. And they may vote to end them as early as October. Chairman Pai calls his rule rollback “restoring internet freedom” but that’s really the freedom of the 1% to make decisions that limit the rest of the population.

At Mozilla we believe the current rules provide vital protections to ensure that ISPs don’t act as gatekeepers for online content and services. Millions of people commented on the FCC docket, including those who commented through Mozilla’s portal that removing these core protections will hurt consumers and small businesses alike.

Mozilla is also very much focused on the issues preventing people coming online beyond the United States. Before addressing the situation in the U.S., journalist Rob Pegoraro asked me what we discovered in the research we recently funded in seven other countries into the impact of zero rating on Internet use:


(Video courtesy: GSMA)

If you happen to be in San Francisco on Monday 18th September please consider joining Mozilla and the Internet Archive for a special night: The Battle to Save Net Neutrality. Tickets are available here.

You’ll be able to watch a discussion featuring former FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler; Representative Ro Khanna; Mozilla Chief Legal and Business Officer Denelle Dixon; Amy Aniobi, Supervising Producer, Insecure (HBO); Luisa Leschin, Co-Executive Producer/Head Writer, Just Add Magic (Amazon); Malkia Cyril, Executive Director of the Center for Media Justice; and Dane Jasper, CEO and Co-Founder of Sonic. The panel will be moderated by Gigi Sohn, Mozilla Tech Policy Fellow and former Counselor to Chairman Wheeler. It will discuss how net neutrality promotes democratic values, social justice and economic opportunity, what the current threats are, and what the public can do to preserve it.

Resignation as co-chair of the Digital Economy Board of Advisors

August 18th, 2017

For the past year and a half I have been serving as one of two co-chairs of the U.S. Commerce Department Digital Economy Board of Advisors. The Board was appointed in March 2016 by then-Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzer to serve a two year term. On Thursday I sent the letter below to Secretary Ross.

Dear Secretary Ross,
I am resigning from my position as a member and co-chair of the Commerce Department’s Digital Economy Board of Advisors, effective immediately.
It is the responsibility of leaders to take action and lift up each and every American. Our leaders must unequivocally denounce bigotry, racism, sexism, hate, and violence.
The digital economy is fundamental to creating an economy that offers opportunity to all Americans. It has been an honor to serve as member and co-chair of this board and to work with the Commerce Department staff.
Sincerely,
Mitchell Baker
Executive Chairwoman
Mozilla

New Mozilla Foundation Board Members: Mohamed Nanabhay and Nicole Wong

April 28th, 2017

Today, I’m thrilled to announce that Mohamed Nanabhay and Nicole Wong have joined the Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors.

Over the last few years, we’ve been working to expand the boards for both the Mozilla Foundation and the Mozilla Corporation. Our goals for the Foundation board roles were to grow Mozilla’s capacity to move our mission forward; expand the number and diversity of people on our boards, and; add specific skills in areas related to movement building and organizational excellence. Adding Mohamed and Nicole represents a significant move forward on these goals.

We met Mohamed about seven years ago through former board member and then Creative Commons CEO Joi Ito. Mohamed was at Al Jazeera at the time and hosted one of Mozilla’s first Open News fellows. Mohamed Nanabhay currently serves as the Deputy CEO of the Media Development Investment Fund (MDIF), which invests in independent media around the world providing the news, information and debate that people need to build free, thriving societies.

Nicole is an attorney specializing in Internet, media and intellectual property law. She served as President Obama’s deputy chief technology officer (CTO) and has also worked as the vice president and deputy general counsel at Google to arbitrate issues of censorship. Nicole has already been active in helping Mozilla set up a new fellows program gathering people who have worked in government on progressive tech policy. That program launches in June.

Talented and dedicated people are the key to building an Internet as a global public resource that is open and accessible to all. Nicole and Mohammad bring expertise, dedication and new perspectives to Mozilla. I am honored and proud to have them as our newest Board members.

Please join me in welcoming Mohamed and Nicole to the Board. You can read more about why Mohamed chose to join the Board here, and why Nicole joined us here.

Mitchell

The “Worldview” of Mozilla

March 13th, 2017

There are a set of topics that are important to Mozilla and to what we stand for in the world — healthy communities, global communities, multiculturalism, diversity, tolerance, inclusion, empathy, collaboration, technology for shared good and social benefit.  I spoke about them at the Mozilla All Hands in December, if you want to (re)listen to the talk you can find it here.  The sections where I talk about these things are at the beginning, and also starting at about the 14:30 minute mark.

These topics are a key aspect of Mozilla’s worldview.  However, we have not set them out officially as part of who we are, what we stand for and how we describe ourselves publicly.   I’m feeling a deep need to do so.

My goal is to develop a small set of principles about these aspects of Mozilla’s worldview. We have clear principles that Mozilla stands for topics such as security and free and open source software (principles 4 and 7 of the Manifesto).  Similarly clear principles about topic such as global communities and multiculturalism will serve us well as we go forward.  They will also give us guidance as to the scope and public voice of Mozilla, spanning official communications from Mozilla, to the unofficial ways each of us describes Mozilla.

Currently, I’m working on a first draft of the principles.  We are working quickly, as quickly as we can have rich discussions and community-wide participation. If you would like to be involved and can potentially spend some hours reviewing and providing input please sign up here. Jascha and Jane are supporting me in managing this important project.  
I’ll provide updates as we go forward.  

A Thank You to Reid Hoffman

January 31st, 2017

Today I want to say thank you to Reid Hoffman for 11 years as a Mozilla Corporation board member. Reid’s normal “tour of duty” on a board is much shorter. Reid joined Mozilla as an expression of his commitment to the Open Internet and the Mozilla mission, and he’s demonstrated that regularly. Almost five years ago I asked Reid if he would remain on the Mozilla board even though he had already been a member for six years. Reid agreed. When Chris Beard joined us Reid agreed to serve another two years in order to help Chris get settled and prime Mozilla for the new era.

Mozilla is in a radically better place today than we were two, three, or five years ago, and is poised for a next phase of growth and influence. Take a look at the Annual Report we published Dec 1, 2016 to get a picture of our financial and operational health. Or look at The Glass Room, or our first  Internet Health Report, or the successful launch of Firefox Focus (or Walt Mossberg’s article about Mozilla) to see what we’ve done the last few months.

And so after an extended “tour of duty” Reid is leaving the Mozilla Corporation board and becoming an Emeritus board member. He remains a close friend and champion of Mozilla and the Open Internet. He continues to help identify technologists, entrepreneurs, and allies who would be a good fit to join Mozilla, including at the board level.  He also continues to meet with and provide support to our key executives.

A heartfelt thank you to Reid.

Helen Turvey Joins the Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors

December 5th, 2016

This post was originally posted on the Mozilla.org website.

Helen Turvey, new Mozilla Foundation Board member

Helen Turvey, new Mozilla Foundation Board member

Today, we’re welcoming Helen Turvey as a new member of the Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors. Helen is the CEO of the Shuttleworth Foundation. Her focus on philanthropy and openness throughout her career makes her a great addition to our Board.

Throughout 2016, we have been focused on board development for both the Mozilla Foundation and the Mozilla Corporation boards of directors. Our recruiting efforts for board members has been geared towards building a diverse group of people who embody the values and mission that bring Mozilla to life. After extensive conversations, it is clear that Helen brings the experience, expertise and approach that we seek for the Mozilla Foundation Board.

Helen has spent the past two decades working to make philanthropy better, over half of that time working with the Shuttleworth Foundation, an organization that provides funding for people engaged in social change and helping them have a sustained impact. During her time with the Shuttleworth Foundation, Helen has driven the evolution from traditional funder to the current co-investment Fellowship model.

Helen was educated in Europe, South America and the Middle East and has 15 years of experience working with international NGOs and agencies. She is driven by the belief that openness has benefits beyond the obvious. That openness offers huge value to education, economies and communities in both the developed and developing worlds.

Helen’s contribution to Mozilla has a long history: Helen chaired the digital literacy alliance that we ran in UK in 2013 and 2014; she’s played a key role in re-imagining MozFest; and she’s been an active advisor to the Mozilla Foundation executive team during the development of the Mozilla Foundation ‘Fuel the Movement’ 3 year plan.

Please join me in welcoming Helen Turvey to the Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors.

Mitchell

You can read Helen’s message about why she’s joining Mozilla here.

Background:

Twitter: @helenturvey

High-res photo

Julie Hanna Joins the Mozilla Corporation Board of Directors

December 1st, 2016

This post was originally posted on the Mozilla.org website.

Julie Hanna, new Mozilla Corporation Board member

Julie Hanna, new Mozilla Corporation Board member

Today, we are very pleased to announce the latest addition to the Mozilla Corporation Board of Directors – Julie Hanna. Julie is the Executive Chairman for Kiva and a Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship and we couldn’t be more excited to have her joining our Board.

Throughout this year, we have been focused on board development for both the Mozilla Foundation and the Mozilla Corporation boards of directors. We envisioned a diverse group who embodied the same values and mission that Mozilla stands for. We want each person to contribute a unique point of view. After extensive conversations, it was clear to the Mozilla Corporation leadership team that Julie brings exactly the type of perspective and approach that we seek.

Born in Egypt, Julie has lived in various countries including Jordan and Lebanon before finally immigrating to the United States. Julie graduated from the University of Alabama at Birmingham with a B.S. in Computer Science. She currently serves as Executive Chairman at Kiva, a peer-peer lending pioneer and the world’s largest crowdlending marketplace for underserved entrepreneurs. During her tenure, Kiva has scaled its reach to 190+ countries and facilitated nearly $1 billion dollars in loans to 2 million people with a 97% repayment rate. U.S. President Barack Obama appointed Julie as a Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship to help develop the next generation of entrepreneurs. In that capacity, her signature initiative has delivered over $100M in capital to nearly 300,000 women and young entrepreneurs across 86 countries.

Julie is known as a serial entrepreneur with a focus on open source. She was a founder or founding executive at several innovative technology companies directly relevant to Mozilla’s world in browsers and open source. These include Scalix, a pioneering open source email/collaboration platform and developer of the most advanced AJAX application of its time, the first enterprise portal provider 2Bridge Software, and Portola Systems, which was acquired by Netscape Communications and become Netscape Mail.

She has also built a wealth of experience as an active investor and advisor to high-growth technology companies, including sharing economy pioneer Lyft, Lending Club and online retail innovator Bonobos. Julie also serves as an advisor to Idealab, Bill Gross’ highly regarded incubator which has launched dozens of IPO-destined companies.

Please join me in welcoming Julie Hanna to the Mozilla Board of Directors.

Mitchell

Background:

Twitter: @JulesHanna

High-res photo

 

Mozilla Hosting the U.S. Commerce Department Digital Economy Board of Advisors

September 30th, 2016

Today Mozilla is hosting the second meeting of the Digital Economy Board of Advisors of the United States Department of Commerce, of which I am co-chair.

Support for the global open Internet is the heart of Mozilla’s identity and strategy. We build for the digital world. We see and understand the opportunities it offers, as well as the threats to its future. We live in a world where a free and open Internet is not available to all of the world’s citizens; where trust and security online cannot be taken for granted; and where independence and innovation are thwarted by powerful interests as often as they are protected by good public policy. As I noted in my original post on being named to the Board, these challenges are central to the “Digital Economy Agenda,” and a key reason why I agreed to participate.

Department of Commerce Secretary Pritzker noted earlier this year: “we are no longer moving toward the digital economy. We have arrived.” The purpose of the Board is to advise the Commerce Department in responding to today’s new status quo. Today technology provides platforms and opportunities that enable entrepreneurs with new opportunities. Yet not everyone shares the benefits. The changing nature of work must also be better understood. And we struggle to measure these gains, making it harder to design policies that maximize them, and harder still to defend the future of our digital economy against myopic and reactionary interests.

The Digital Economy Board of Advisors was convened to explore these challenges, and provide expert advice from a range of sectors of the digital economy to the Commerce Department as it develops future policies. At today’s meeting, working groups within the Board will present their initial findings. We don’t expect to agree on everything, of course. Our goal is to draw out the shared conclusions and direction to provide a balanced, sustainable, durable basis for future Commerce Department policy processes. I will follow up with another post on this topic shortly.

Today’s meeting is a public meeting. There will be two live streams: one for the 8:30 am-12:30 pm PT pre-lunch session and one for the afternoon post-lunch 1:30-3:00pm PT. We welcome you to join us.

Although the Board has many more months left in its tenure, I can see a trend towards healthy alignment between our mission and the outcomes of the Board’s activities. I’m proud to serve as co-chair of this esteemed group of individuals.

UN High Level Panel and UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon issue report on Women’s Economic Empowerment

September 28th, 2016

“Gender equality remains the greatest human rights challenge of our time.”  UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, September 22, 2016.

To address this challenge the Secretary General championed the 2010 creation of UN Women, the UN’s newest entity. To focus attention on concrete actions in the economic sphere he created the “High Level Panel on Women’s Economic Empowerment” of which I am a member.

The Panel presented its initial findings and commitments last week during the UN General Assembly Session in New York. Here is the Secretary General, with the the co-chairs, and the heads of the IMF and the World Bank, the Executive Director of the UN Women, and the moderator and founder of All Africa Media, each of whom is a panel member.

UN General Assembly Session in New York

Photo Credit: Anar Simpson

The findings are set out in the Panel’s initial report. Key to the report is the identification of drivers of change, which have been deemed by the panel to enhance women’s economic empowerment:

  1. Breaking stereotypes: Tackling adverse social norms and promoting positive role models
  2. Leveling the playing field for women: Ensuring legal protection and reforming discriminatory laws and regulations
  3. Investing in care: Recognizing, reducing and redistributing unpaid work and care
  4. Ensuring a fair share of assets: Building assets—Digital, financial and property
  5. Businesses creating opportunities: Changing business culture and practice
  6. Governments creating opportunities: Improving public sector practices in employment and procurement
  7. Enhancing women’s voices: Strengthening visibility, collective voice and representation
  8. Improving sex-disaggregated data and gender analysis

Chapter Four of the report describes a range of actions that are being undertaken by Panel Members for each of the above drivers. For example under the Building assets driver: DFID and the government of Tanzania are extending land rights to more than 150,000 Tanzanian women by the end of 2017. Tanzania will use media to educate people on women’s land rights and laws pertaining to property ownership. Clearly this is a concrete action that can serve as a precedent for others.

As a panel member, Mozilla is contributing to the working on Building Assets – Digital. Here is my statement during the session in New York:

“Mozilla is honored to be a part of this Panel. Our focus is digital inclusion. We know that access to the richness of the Internet can bring huge benefits to Women’s Economic Empowerment. We are working with technology companies in Silicon Valley and beyond to identify those activities which provide additional opportunity for women. Some of those companies are with us today.

Through our work on the Panel we have identified a significant interest among technology companies in finding ways to do more. We are building a working group with these companies and the governments of Costa Rica, Tanzania and the U.A. E. to address women’s economic empowerment through technology.

We expect the period from today’s report through the March meeting to be rich with activity. The possibilities are huge and the rewards great. We are committed to an internet that is open and accessible to all.”

You can watch a recording of the UN High Level Panel on Women’s Economic Empowerment here. For my statement, view starting at: 2.07.53.

There is an immense amount of work to be done to meet the greatest human rights challenge of our time. I left the Panel’s meeting hopeful that we are on the cusp of great progress.

Living with Diverse Perspectives

September 23rd, 2016

Diversity and Inclusion is more than having people of different demographics in a group.  It is also about having the resulting diversity of perspectives included in the decision-making and action of the group in a fundamental way.

I’ve had this experience lately, and it demonstrated to me both why it can be hard and why it’s so important.  I’ve been working on a project where I’m the individual contributor doing the bulk of the work. This isn’t because there’s a big problem or conflict; instead it’s something I feel needs my personal touch. Once the project is complete, I’m happy to describe it with specifics. For now, I’ll describe it generally.

There’s a decision to be made.  I connected with the person I most wanted to be comfortable with the idea to make sure it sounded good.  I checked with our outside attorney just in case there was something I should know.  I checked with the group of people who are most closely affected and would lead the decision and implementation if we proceed. I received lots of positive response.

Then one last person checked in with me from my first level of vetting and spoke up.  He’s sorry for the delay, etc but has concerns.  He wants us to explore a bunch of different options before deciding if we’ll go forward at all, and if so how.

At first I had that sinking feeling of “Oh bother, look at this.  I am so sure we should do this and now there’s all this extra work and time and maybe change. Ugh!”  I got up and walked around a bit and did a few thing that put me in a positive frame of mind.  Then I realized — we had added this person to the group for two reasons.  One, he’s awesome — both creative and effective. Second, he has a different perspective.  We say we value that different perspective. We often seek out his opinion precisely because of that perspective.

This is the first time his perspective has pushed me to do more, or to do something differently, or perhaps even prevent me from something that I think I want to do.  So this is the first time the different perspective is doing more than reinforcing what seemed right to me.

That lead me to think “OK, got to love those different perspectives” a little ruefully.  But as I’ve been thinking about it I’ve come to internalize the value and to appreciate this perspective.  I expect the end result will be more deeply thought out than I had planned.  And it will take me longer to get there.  But the end result will have investigated some key assumptions I started with.  It will be better thought out, and better able to respond to challenges. It will be stronger.

I still can’t say I’m looking forward to the extra work.  But I am looking forward to a decision that has a much stronger foundation.  And I’m looking forward to the extra learning I’ll be doing, which I believe will bring ongoing value beyond this particular project.

I want to build Mozilla into an example of what a trustworthy organization looks like.  I also want to build Mozilla so that it reflects experience from our global community and isn’t living in a geographic or demographic bubble.  Having great people be part of a diverse Mozilla is part of that.  Creating a welcoming environment that promotes the expression and positive reaction to different perspectives is also key.  As we learn more and more about how to do this we will strengthen the ways we express our values in action and strengthen our overall effectiveness.

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